The Tastiest Salad With Edible Rat | The Anyer Salad

Anyer is one of those meats that are so out there and would be revolting to anybody that is unaccustomed to. Let us just call it game meat that comes in small sizes.

This game animal is hunted in the wide expanses of northern Uganda in the rainy season where men and boys follow the anyer’s foot prints on the wet ground and dig up the burrows in which the Anyer live. It is smoked for preservation and then carried home to be cooked into a sumptuous stew.

We have taken this meat a whole notch higher. With our increased consciousness to health, we have turned this once simple stewed meat into a world class salad that would hold its own on any fancy restaurant menu.

The Anyer is delicately filleted to reveal tender strips of meat that will provide a whole load of flavour the otherwise bland salad greens. Finished off with a tangerine vinaigrette, the Anyer salad is something to kickstart your meal like any other salad.

The anger Salad as seen through the lens of Nze Eve.

Here is the recipe: 

Ingredients

  • 200g game meat (cut to strips)
  • 1 carrots (Finely grated)
  • 1 onion (cut to strips)
  • 2 tomato (1 sliced, 1 deseeded and cut to strips )
  • 1 cucumber (Sliced)
  • ½ green pepper (cut to strips )
  • ½ yellow pepper (cut to strips)
  • 2 tablespoon tangerine juice
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 clove garlic
  • Salt and pepper

Method

  1. Place the meat in a pan and add one cup of water, a pinch of salt, 1 clove of garlic and place over fire and allow to simmer uncovered for 20 minutes until most of the water has evaporated. Remove from the pan and allow to cool slightly
  2. Make your vinaigrette using the tangerine and olive oil. Add the salt and pepper for taste. In a large bowl, toss your vegetable strips and the meat. Add the vinaigrette and toss to coat all the vegetables
  3. Arrange the tomato and cucumber slices in rings, one on top of the other in the center of a clean wide white plate and place the salad on top of this.

Eat up before your neighbor comes knocking

The Ugandan Rolex With A Twist In The Ingredients

Finally Uganda got a fast food that was marketed as being authentically Ugandan. The Rolex was credited to a hungry young Ugandan who in an attempt to make a quick hearty meal rolled a chapati with an omelette and the rolex was born. It was designed to cater to the needs of the financially constrained market but the rolex has been embraced by nearly everybody, from the boda rider for lunch to the bank executive leaving the bar at 5am. The rolex is made in nearly every part of the country and new varients of the classic and iconic dish have been created.  Who are we not to make it bigger and better?

Uganda has been credited with being the largest consumers of pork in the world which is surely no mean fit.

To celebrate these two items that make Uganda stand out, we have merged them to deliver The Porlex!

Made with pulled pork, the prolex is a dish to savor. Picture the succulent pork strips with notes of ginger and lemon tied in with a perfect fluffy two egg omelette with “Nyanya Mbisi”. Simply something to die for.

The porlex as seen through the lens of NZE_EVE

Here is the recipe:

Ingredients

  • 200g pork (Fat removed)
  • 2 tomatoes
  • 2 small onions
  • 1 teaspoon grated ginger
  • 1 tablespoon lemon juice
  • 2 cloves garlic
  • ¼ teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon soy sauce
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons mayonnaise
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 teaspoon chopped green pepper
  • 200ml water
  • 1 large chapati

Method

  1. Into a pressure cooker, add the pork, 1 tomato, 1 onion, garlic, black pepper, ginger, lemon, soy sauce and water. Cover and place over fire and allow to cook until the pan hisses twice, about 25 minutes. Remove from fire and displace pressure valve to allow the steam escape so you can open the pressure cooker
  2. Remove the pork from the cooker and remove the flesh from the bones. The pork is cooked on the bone to increase the flavour and improve the flavour and taste of the pork. Place the pork in a bowl and mix with the mayo. Add a bit of the cooking liquid if necessary to make it easy to mix the contents of the bowl. Set aside.
  3. Finely chop the onion, tomato and green pepper; break the eggs into a bowl and add the chopped onion, green pepper and half the chopped tomato. Beat and fry the omelet on a hot pan ensuring that the egg does not brown. Flip and cook the other side.
  4. Place the chapati on a clean plate or board and place cooked egg over the chapati. Spoon the pork mix over the egg and sprinkle with the remaining raw tomato aka nyanya mbisi. Roll up tightly and slice the porlex diagonally in half and place on a clean white plate.
  5. Lock your door and turn off your phone. Call your ex and tell them the story after you have eaten. Jealousy will bring him or her back into your arms if only for a taste of the porlex.
You want Nyanya mbiisi on the side, well you can.
Photo credit: Nze Eve

Introducing Chicken Katogo

Katogo was invented as an all in one pot meal. Katogo was primarily made from either matooke or cassava as a starch base and beans or groundnut paste as the protein-based stew. It was the poor man’s solution after a long day in the garden. The perfect medley.

As times changed and appeal for katogo increased, meats, offals, and vegetables substituted beans and the ground nuts. I have even been served Katogo with pork and it was delish.
Because of the view that Katogo is a meal for the poor, chicken is considered a no-go when it comes to the making of Katogo. We do not see it that way!
We are taking it higher!! Introducing chicken katogo.
We have substituted the beans with chicken and created a dish fit for royalty.

The New #KoikoiDelicacy Chicken Katongo
photo credit: Nze Eve

Here is the recipe:

Summary – The chicken is let to simmer in a pan with carrots and leeks for 30 minutes; then set aside to cool. The matooke is boiled in this stock for 20 minutes until just cooked. The chicken is pan seared to a crisp golden brown and served with the matooke and a consume from the stock and host of seasonal vegetable.

Full details; 

Ingredients

4 drumsticks
8 fingers matooke
1 large onion
3 tomatoes
1 green pepper
2 clove garlic
2 tablespoons oil
Salt and pepper

Method

Place the chicken in a pan with the 1 teaspoon salt, garlic, onion and tomatoes, all finely chopped and cooked covered for 15 minutes; stirring frequently to keep the contents from sticking to the bottom of the pan
The chicken should have turned whitish by this point. Remove it and place it on a plate and put the matooke into the pan and add water to cover the matooke. Cook over medium heat to cook and leave to simmer for 20 minutes until just cooked but not mushy. Remove the cover from the pan and allow the cooking liquid to reduce
On a clean skillet or pan, add a tablespoon of oil and leave to heat up. Add a teaspoon of chopped garlic and fry til tender. Add chicken to the pan and cook until evenly browned
Serve the matooke and chicken with a garnish of chopped tomatoes and green pepper. Add the cooking liquid to coat the matooke and chicken.
Lick the plate when done

Here Are 5 Reasons Why You Should Visit Lake Mburo National Park, Uganda

It is the nearest national park to Kampala. It is only 240km away from the city and in comparison to other national parks you can set off, depending on how much time you spend taking pictures of your self at the equator or stuffing up on chicken in Lukaya you can be one with the wild of Lake Mburo in 4 hours. It’s also not too far away from major towns in Lyantonde and Mbarara district

Zebras. Lake Mburo is home to most of Uganda’s Zebras. There is an entire zebra track after the Nshara gate in Lake Mburo National Park. It is like after paying your park entrance fees, herds of them come to welcome you to their territory.  Zebras are beautiful and from their demeanour, they love to have their pictures taken.  Someone joked that the zebras have been trained by UWA to work their angles and show their good side, whenever they see a camera.  You may not come out of Lake Mburo with the answer to whether zebras are black with white stripes or white with black stripes,  but you will see enough of them to choose a side to this argument and defend it.  For example, I think they are brown with cream stripes.

The Zebra welcoming you to Lake Mburo National Park.
Photo Credit: Pipes | Kreative Adkit

A leopard. Not leopards but one leopard. We did our game drive in the morning and according to Immaculate our guide, we had zero to none chances of seeing a leopard because they are nocturnal. (Just a fancy word for they feed at night). She didn’t lie about that. However later in the evening while we drove out of the park, we saw one. Chilling by itself below an anthill probably aiming for its dinner.

The leopard in the Lake Mburo National Park, Uganda
#KoikoiUG Photo credit: Nze Eve

The bus got excited.  Fingers started being pointed. Yelling at the driver to; stop, reverse a little, go slightly ahead all at once ensued until everyone caught a glimpse of this big cat with spots (If you have no idea what I am talking about, at least you have seen leopard print fabric.) Cameras were aimed at it and all the wows and “did you see it(s)” managed to scare it away, or as I like to think we saved an animal from being dinner.

The Lake. First of all the UWA boat is new. All the life jackets are still intact so are the seats and paint so it gives a false sense of safety like crocodiles give a damn about, seats paint and inflated orange jackets but that’s not the point. The point is we love water or at least most people do. If you don’t believe me, ask anyone who stopped going to the beach why they did and I will bet that the answer will be they were too crowded.  Taking pictures on the water with your shades on gives “life eater” bragging rights,  plus the breeze is refreshing.  A welcome change from Kampala’s sewer filled air ( especially if you don’t live or work in Kololo).

The Aerial view of some part of Lake Mburo
Shot by Mu | Mugasha Arnold

On Lake Mburo, you will see hippos and maybe two crocodiles and several birds. You will make jokes about whether falling off the boat will scare the crocodile away or send it running towards you piece of meat.  You will take several pictures while you are posing and others while you stare at the waves. The kind that you will put on Instagram with long “deep” captions about reflecting on life and how it’s like the waves or if you are me,  something about God being a genius. You will hardly hear anything, Rebecca, the guide, and her megaphone will say about the lake unless she is thanking you for being a lovely crowd and telling you to get the hell off her new boat. You will have spent 1 hour and 30 minutes on the lake and that will make you feel things. Good things.

Joanne and Jeddy on the #LiveThe4GExperience plan, next to Lake Mburo.
Photo Credit: Pipes | Kreative Adkit

There is nothing wrong with being a tourist. Maybe if we all gathered some Shell fuel Save and our favorite people every few months and became local tourists the people in charge will stop giving us rates in US Dollars. And when you do, load some Airtel Data Blasta and share your authentic Ugandan story. There are not very many out there.

About the Author:

 

Komusana Fiona | Sunshine – She loves to have an opinion but more than that she loves to give it, so she writes. The idea that she gets to express her opinion without looking any one in the face is motivating.

Sunshine, Patriarchy and Nsenene

Nsenene season is upon us and it is happiness all around. November is not just a month away from Christmas bonuses (if you are those people) and jingle bells. It also ushers in grasshoppers. These are not just ordinary insects. Here are some personal truths about them.

  1. Unlike most insects, we wait on them all year and when they arrive we don’t bring out doom or whatever insecticide to kill them because they are not harmful to our health. We set up iron sheets with light and trap them. Okay maybe we don’t do the trapping ourselves but people do and we pay them money for it which brings me to my next point.
  2. They are bringing this country closer to midro income status. Throughout the month of November, nsenene employ a good number of Ugandans. Some are wholesalers. They send their truckloads of this delicacy to urban dwellers. Others are sigiri owning chefs frying and dishing out yummy portions in the middle of the old taxi park.  And others will be shoving them down your car window or taxi while you are stuck in Kampala’s unending traffic.
  3. They used to be the key to getting Christmas outfits. According to my grandmother who is a very wise woman nsenene alongside chicken and eggs are on the list women were not allowed to eat but they would catch, hunt, conquer, solicit them for their husbands in order to encourage them to buy them to buy her Christmas clothes. (I don’t know what to say to that except that patriarchy is greedy and mean and therefore we should all be feminists)

I really thought I had more nsenene truths but they are done, almost as fast as any amount of nsenene that comes into my proximity. I am open to any and all invitations to eat nsenene this November. Totally unrelated, why has no one come up with nsenene rolex, or nsenene pizza, or nsenene burger, or nsensene salad?  So many possibilities.

About the Author:

 

Komusana Fiona | Sunshine – She loves to have an opinion but more than that she loves to give it, so she writes. The idea that she gets to express her opinion without looking any one in the face is motivating.

Ghost Tales | Abasezzi

Mythical creatures and ghosts are probably a part of many more childhoods than adulthood. Nonetheless, we have all heard, and at best experienced them.
In Uganda, it’s probably the famous Bukalabanda or perhaps the Basezzi commonly referred to as night-dancers. Whatever your encounter with Mystical creatures, you have one! Let’s explore some of these stories here.
Buckle up! These stories have made grown men wet their pants.

Abasezzi;

“I come from central Uganda, Buganda in particular and those that hail from the same are no strangers to the fantasy or reality of Abasezzi, the night-dancers, not crawlers, these guys actually dance around at night.

The most fascinating technicality to their dance is the that they do this stack-naked, Adam’s suit. Oh! And often in graveyards. Which is where they’re said to take their next meal from. Aren’t we glad they’re not killing and eating? hehehe…at least they’re only taking the dead. Still, these guys are said to be cannibals. Truth be told, many villagers have found their loved ones’ recently dug graves turned inside out only days after their funerals” Joanne Nvannungi narrates.

These night-dancers are thought to be demon-possessed, or as my people say “balina ekitambo” (they’re under a spell). In their element, they appear taller than usual, very swift & posses charms and powers.The demon that possesses these abasezzi is said to be contagious, and can possess another person especially if you in the vicinity.

“I first came to hear about the basezzi when I was 6 years old, visiting my grandparents deep down in Bukomansibi (now a district, yaaay), then a part of Masaka district. Yoh, the stories left you numb & a tad curious, but you know we are not cats, we only got one life.
If you think I’m lying, wait out by the banana plantation in the night & maybe you’ll hear the rustling of dried banana fiber. Next you’ll see the fire. When they clap their hands, fire comes out. And then they’ll merge, dark shapes of naked grown-a** men & women. Yoh! And if you stick around and let them touch you, you’ll become one of them. You’ll catch ekitambo! By the way, you can’t outrun them. They’ll catch you and maybe even just appear in front of you as you scatter.” She added.

Do you have any basezzi tales? Share with us.