Koikoi Delicacy: Color. Taste. Variety.

Uganda is so rich in the variety of food on offer, ranging from fresh food to processed food. One might live all of their life in Uganda without ever having to consume processed food. This variety and depth of the offering is what #KoikoiDelicacy themed week sought to capture.

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FLUENT UGANDAN

I came across this video on Facebook today about this girl who speaks “fluent American.” Basically, she was talking to this guy in the UK about something she wanted him to buy for her. She literally put the gold in gold digger, and it’s not in the way you think. On explaining to the guy that what she wanted, he said it was too expensive, “an entire 15 pounds” he said. She however could not understand why he was telling her how heavy it was instead of how much it cost.  As I said, pure gold right? This got me thinking though, what do people think of Uganda in “fluent American,” or “fluent German” or “fluent French?” What shapes their vocabulary about our country?

Very recently the dictionary was updated. They added words like ‘side-boob’ and ‘amaze-balls,’ words for so long that were not considered acceptable in the English language but now can be used in a PhD thesis. These words were being used so much that the snobbish aristocrats who decide what is and what isn’t English had no choice but to let them into their circle of acceptable lingual.

So the snobbish aristocrats of fluent American, or fluent French might think we live in trees, own giraffes or that Idi Amin is still our president, and maybe that is all the section on Uganda in their dictionary says. We however can’t tell the world so many stories about this country that they have no choice but ti expand their vocabulary. We can put 1 million photos of this beautiful country on the internet, on Instagram and by extension Facebook. We can make the world a little wiser. We can shout #koikoiug from the roof tops.

Ps: In case you are still wondering the application of the word ‘amazeballs,’well;

A.maze.balls /əˈmāzbôlz/ : extremely good or impressive: amazing.

Uganda is amazeballs. Tell someone about it using the hash tag #koikoiug.

Side boob is self-explanatory, unless of course you are six.

#KOIKOIUG: IT IS BIGGER THAN ANY ONE OF US. IT TAKES ALL OF US. WHAT IS IT?

An honest, balanced depiction of Uganda. That is what #Koikoiug is supposed to be. That’s what we at Kafunda Kreative want it to be, all three of us so far. But then there is what the cold feet want it to be. “Oh you have no sponsorship they say, you won’t be able to pull it off.” “Oh you have no incentives; people won’t participate if you are not giving them something.”

It has been a scary couple of months trying to make #koikoiug work. Countless meetings, postponements, waking up in cold sweats, prayer, knocking on doors, begging, you name it, we have done it.

Cold feet say, “what if it doesn’t work out, what if no one comes, what if no one participates?” And every day we have pushed on, saying, “ what if they do?” What if Ugandans stand up, get together and minus all the gimmicks and flash put 1 million photos of Uganda out on the internet? What if we tell 1 million stories? What if Ugandans shout out Koikoi? What if we manage to put out Uganda’s first crowd sourced ad? Can we tell a story about this country, our country that will stop the world in its tracks?

That story starts this weekend, Sunday September 13th, as we do an Instawalk around Kampala, starting at the KCCA Katale and ending at the Gadhafi mosque capturing the pulsating urban culture of our countries capital. After which, all through to the 20th of November, we shall have a weekly photo challenge with themes like Landmarks, Independence, Innovation, Night out, Proudly East African and so many more. And at the end of those 10 weeks, all this will put into a series of ads reminding the world, that Uganda is still The Pearl of Africa.

How do you get involved? Well, show up for the Instawalk this weekend. Be a part of the 10 week photo challenge. If you are a business, get in touch, give something, support the team that’s doing this. Otherwise spread the word, share this blog post. Follow Kafunda Kreative on twitter, facebook and Instagram, and share the weeks themes, tell a friend, whatever you can do, do it. Just don’t sit it out.

An honest, balanced depiction of Uganda, for Uganda, by Ugandans. We cannot do that without Ugandans. We cannot do it without you.

WHATS BLUE, DOESN’T EXIST, AND COMES ONCE A WEEK TO TORMENT US?

I have the coolest job in the world, or so I think. I don’t have to be in the office at 8 am and that means I can sleep in, I work four hours a day and I can wear shorts and flip flops on a Monday. I should be the last person to complain about the blues.  (ok, save for mattress tester who is literally paid to sleep. Yes, mattress tester is a real job) Everything should be rosy, but it isn’t. Like the majority of people, I dread Mondays, and the funny thing is, like the majority of people, I do not know why. Do you know why you hate Mondays? Oh, you are some sort of super human who doesn’t succumb to the whims and desires of us mere mortals? My bad! When you think about it, there is no reason to hate Mondays, unless you hate you job, and in that case the problem isn’t with Monday but is with your current employ. Also when you think about it, succumb is such a funny word, sounds very made up. Like more made up than other made up English words. I know, it is one of those ones you want to say over and over again. Succumb! Succumb! Okay, now its no longer just in your head, you are now vocalizing, and in comes that dumb childish grin, and wait for it, the full on chuckle. Stop it, people might actually think you are crazy.

Sad thing about the world though, is we don’t find the belief in the existence of Monday blues crazy. The belief in the existence of some imaginary nemesis, with a cloak made out of paper work whose sole purpose is to make the beginning of the week suck. How is that not crazy? We encourage imaginary friends now? Oh! Okay. Like most things, Monday blues are another lie we have sold to ourselves, and not until you stop buying it do you realise how much it affects you way of life.

Yes, you guessed right. I am going to switch up this nicely crafted tale about the blues and make it about KoiKoiug, because that was always the plan; to draw you in with some almost funny commentary on blues and then bam!!!! Koikoiug.

We are what we believe. And those beliefs affect how we see the world and inherently our quality of life too. If Monday blues are your beliefs about Mondays, then your start of the week is going to suck. Now this doesn’t mean that shitty stuff doesn’t happen on Mondays, it sure does., but the blues ensure we stay with that pants down, toilet like feeling even when there is nothing toilet like happening. Same thing about country. Are you having the blues for your country; A persistent toilet like feeling about your motherland even when there is nothing toilet like happening? What do you believe? Koikoi!!!

PS: A couple of friends and I (@kafundakreative) are wondering why blue? Shouldn’t they have been Monday greys? Coz blue is such a nice, calming color.  Follow us on Facebook, twitter and Instagram to start a petition to change that. Also there is another petition to do something about that toilet feeling we have towards out country called #Koikoiug, we hope you sign up.

I hope you read that in an Obama voice, because then it sounds cooler and exponentially more inspiring. Ok bye.

#KOIKOIUG: THE PEARL OF AFRICA

“How does your program highlight the plight of the women? How can your initiative be used by the youth to discuss issues affecting them? “Questions like this are the daily bread of interviews, and honestly it gets tiring to hear them over and over and over again. Now this is not because we are insensitive to the plight, we are very much are aware of the sick, the poor, the ailing systems and infrastructure you name it, we live with it every day, but from taking a moment to stop and take it all in, we realise, that maybe without knowing, the plight has begun to define us. Has that become all we see when we look at our country? Think about it for a second, isn’t one of the problems with this, our Pearl of Africa, our vantage point? Do we hurry to point out what is wrong, but are hesitant to acknowledge when things are right?

Come on a journey with us will you, to the year 1908. Tribes were at war with one another, men were being traded for salt and mirrors, communication took days, roads networks barely existent, hospitals a dream, education for the lucky few, and yet during this time Uganda was baptised the Pearl of Africa. There have been many theories as to why Churchill called Uganda the pearl, but let me give you mine.

Have you ever researched on how a pearl is made? It’s fascinating really. When a foreign object like a grain of sand makes it way through the shells of an oyster, in order to protect itself, it builds a mass around it, which mass becomes the pearl. That is the short version really but you see how magnificent this is, don’t you? From the ‘plight’ of the oyster comes the pearl.

Churchill looked at Uganda, he looked at the sickness, the pain, the war, but he also looked at the magnificent scenery, the beautiful culture in our 50 plus tribes, the wildlife, and despite he saw the mass, the beautiful mass that formed around the plight and decided to call us the Pearl of Africa. What could change if we looked at our country the way he did?

The oyster build a large beauty, a pearl, around a grain of sand. We seem to have built a large grain of sand around our pearl. If we chose to “protect”( read show the world) our pearl, wouldn’t we attract more tourists, better investors and thus create more jobs and more stability? If we chose to tell the full story, how many minds could we change, how many stereotypes could we break?  Isn’t the root of our problem, our vantage point?

That’s is the riddle that needs to be solved. Koikoi.